Welcome And A Good ------ ------ There Are Enjoying Hardcore News! ------ Thank You For Visiting The Hardcore News Web Site! ------ The Most Comprehensive Global News On The Internet! ------ Your , Area's Most Updated News In The , AND THE WORLD! ------ PLEASE NOTE: Hardcore News Is Best If Used With Firefox Or Google Chrome Gecko Type Browser: ------ Hardcore News Web Site Is Best Using A Screen Setting Of 1024 X 768 Or Higher... ------ Your Current IP Address Is From Internet Provider ... This is All We Know About You, Ever Wonder What Kind Of Information Other Web Sites Could Get From Your Computer?... PLEASE BE CAREFUL Who You Share Information With Online! ------ By submitting personal information to any U.S. website, you are consenting that your information is being maintained and or being used here in the United States, is subjected to applicable U.S. laws. Thus... U.S. law may be different than the laws of your home country. ------ Hardcore News IS SAFE! We Never Track Your Moves Or Sell Your Information. ------ The Only Bull-Sh-t On This Site Is The Propaganda! ------ Stay Informed With The Hardcore News ------ All News is AUTO-UPDATED - AUTO-GENERATED Via Keyword Search Terms And Use Of RSS Based News Feeds And Tabbed Headlines On One Page ------ News From Over 40 Reliable News Sources, Even The News Your Not Supposed To Know! ------ PROVIDING UP TO THE MINUTE NEWS With LIVE Video Feeds FROM AROUND THE WORLD! ------ OUR NEWS IS ALWAYS FRESH DIRECTLY FROM THE SOURCE! ------ Again Thank You For Visiting The Hardcore News ------ If You Like This Project And Would Like To See & Help It Grow, Please Consider Donating What Ever You Can By Secure PayPal CLICK HERE ------ Please make a gift to Hardcore News today. Your continued support will ensure that Hardcore News is here reporting THE TRUTH, for a long time to come. It's fast, easy and secure. And Thank You, ------ Only YOU Can Make This Project Worth While! ------ Again Thank You For Visiting The Hardcore News ------
Hardcore Main Stream
Top Stories

Mid East Watch

Politics

Tech News

Entertainment

Sports News


Wednesday, July 6, 2011

69 yr Old Homeowner Opened Fire During No-Knock Police Raid On His Home

STORY: Deadly police search in Hampton began as raid for painkillers

William A. Cooper was killed during police raid Saturday

The crime scene at Clifton Street and Kecoughtan Road in Hampton 
where officers shot dead a man who police say fired at them 
during a narcotics operation. (David Macaulay, Daily Press / June 18, 2011)




HAMPTON — A friend of the Hampton man shot and killed during a police raid at his house Saturday said he thinks the 69-year-old man opened fire on officers because he was startled and thought they were criminal intruders.

William A. Cooper had poor eyesight because of cataracts and would often sleep late, said Richard Zacharias, 58, a retired NASA employee who was renting a trailer home from Cooper and planned to buy it from him.

Both of those factors, Zacharias said, might have caused him not to realize that it was the police that were in his home at 10 a.m.

"People around here sleep with a gun beside their bed because of all the home invasions we've had," Zacharias said. "The guy was a nice guy. The guy was a good guy."

By "around here," Zacharias said he wasn't referring only to a specific section of Hampton, but the entire region and beyond. A Hampton police spokesman said that there haven't been any home invasions on Clifton Street or the nearby surrounding area in the past five years.

A search warrant affidavit filed in Hampton Circuit Court before the search said police were investigating allegations that Cooper was illegally selling prescription painkillers out of his home.

The affidavit said a confidential informant told police that Cooper had sold methadone, Percocet and "several other unknown prescription pills" from his home on Clifton Street, off Kecoughtan Road in Wythe.

Police executed the warrant in search of those drugs just after 10 a.m. Saturday, with a neighbor saying he saw Cooper's door being forced open. Police said two officers shot Cooper inside the house after he fired at them.

Cooper was pronounced dead at about 11 a.m. at Riverside Regional Medical Center.

Hampton Police Chief Charles R. Jordan Jr. has backed the two officers involved in the shooting, saying the case appears to be a justified act of self-defense. The officers — one with 23 years of experience and the other with another with 14 years of experience — are now on administrative leave with pay.

"The investigation thus far supports the actions of the officers," Jordan said Saturday. "They were met with deadly force and had no alternative other than to return fire."

Zacharias has a different slant. "He wasn't real big, he wasn't real threatening," Zacharias said. "It doesn't smell right." The police killed Cooper "in his own house, and that doesn't sit right with me."

He said that Cooper, also known as "Bootsie," often used a cane, talked a lot about back and knee pain, and used a lot of painkillers, telling friends the drugs he was getting "weren't enough" for the pain.

Hampton police spokesman Jason Price said police officers executing the warrant identified themselves when they arrived. "We did knock and announce our presence," he said. "It was not a no-knock search warrant."

Price declined to say whether the officers forced entry into the home. But the neighbor's report of a forced entry was backed by the fact that the left side of the front door, near the door jam, was severely broken.

A common practice in executing a warrant is for police to announce their presence with loud knocks on the front door and words such as, "Police!" or "Police search warrant!"

After a few moments of warning, the door is typically broken, often with a battering ram or other device.

The element of surprise is considered important in many such cases to not allow time for the suspect to hide or dispose of the drugs, such as by flushing them down the toilet.

Price said that even after officers are inside a home, they continue to call out, "Police! Police! Police!" in loud tones. He also said that officers conducting such searches wear clothing marked on both front and back with large letters saying, "POLICE."

"It's very obvious that we're the police," he said.

Price said that in this case, there was an exchange of gunfire, with Cooper shooting first and the officers firing back.

Price declined to say whether painkillers or other drugs were found in Cooper's home. But he said that the search warrant's list of returned items would soon be filed with the court.

The incident will be investigated by police as both a criminal and administrative matter. The results of the investigation will be turned over to Commonwealth's Attorney Linda Curtis, who will make the final call on any charges.

In the meantime, the community is left to wonder how exactly the events transpired that morning.

There was an empty bar stool at the White Oak Lodge, a bar and restaurant on Kecoughtan Road that Cooper would frequent. Cooper would come in almost daily, take his regular seat at the corner of the wooden bar and order Budweiser beer. He would often bet on horse races through an electronic betting system, and tell stories about fishing and the crab docks.

A White Oak bartender said Cooper was at the bar on Friday night from the time she got in to work around 6 p.m. until when he left at around 10 p.m. or 11 p.m. It was "early for him" to leave, she said. "I was expecting to see him the next day. I'm still trying to piece it all together. He was a good, old gentleman. It's very sad."

Cooper's small home on Clifton Street had a black El Camino car parked in the driveway Monday morning. There were three small and worn American flags posted into the ground around a small tree, a posted sign for "24-hour security," and some tomato plants around back.

Daily Press reporter http://bio.tribune.com/michaelholtzclaw contributed to this report.

http://www.dailypress.com/news/hampton/dp-nws-hampton-police-shooting-folo-20110620,0,4280586.story

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Police: Man Killed by Police During Paramilitary Drug Raid Shows Dangers of Paramilitary Drug Raids the Dangers Police Must Face Every Day

Tuesday, June 21st, 2011 theagitator.com

Another week, another man shot dead during a drug raid. William Cooper, 69, of Hampton, Virginia, was killed over the weekend after an informant told local police that he was selling prescription painkillers. Cooper apparently fired at the police as they came into his home.
There’s nothing in the articles linked above, or this one, indicating that police found anything incriminating in Cooper’s home. Maybe that information will come out later. But generally speaking, when police do find evidence of criminal activity after a raid, that information is quickly handed over to the press, particularly in raids that end in violence.
Instead, we get to read about the service records of the cops who killed Cooper, how this example of police killing a man is just more proof of the dangers of police work, how thankful the Hampton Police department is “that the officers are OK and safe and were not injured,” and how sorry we should feel for the officers who killed Cooper because “their lives will never be the same.”
From an interview with a neighbor:
Jesse Pittman, was working on the air conditioning unit on the roof of the Living Water Tabernacle Baptist Church at 1612 Kecoughtan Road, about three properties away from the house that was raided, on Saturday morning when he saw a large white, unmarked van pull up in Clifton Street.
He said about five or six police officers got out of the van and kicked in the door of a house. “I just heard shots. I can’t say how many,” he said.
“Just heard shots.” That would seem to indicate that he did not hear an announcement.This article indicates that Cooper’s neighbors saw no evidence of drug activity at his home. From an interview with a friend of Cooper’s:
A friend of the Hampton man shot and killed during a police raid at his house Saturday said he thinks the 69-year-old man opened fire on officers because he was startled and thought they were criminal intruders . . .
Both of those factors, Zacharias said, might have caused him not to recognize the police conducting the 10 a.m. search.
“People around here sleep with a gun beside their bed because of all the home invasions we’ve had,” Zacharias said. “The guy was a nice guy. The guy was a good guy.”
Once again, we also get the absurd-on-its-face argument from the police that these tactics are both absolutely necessary to preserve “the element of surprise” and that there’s simply no way Cooper couldn’t have known that the men breaking into his home were cops:
Price declined to say whether the officers forced entry into the home. But the neighbor’s report of a forced entry was backed by the fact that the left side of the front door, near the door jam, was severely broken.
A common practice in executing a warrant is for police to announce their presence with loud knocks on the front door and words such as, “Police!” or “Police search warrant!”
After a few moments of warning, the door is typically broken, often with a battering ram or other device.
The element of surprise is considered important in many such cases to not allow time for the suspect to hide or dispose of the drugs, such as by flushing them down the toilet.
Price said that even after officers are inside a home, they continue to call out, “Police! Police! Police!” in loud tones. He also said that officers conducting such searches wear clothing marked on both front and back with large letters saying, “POLICE.”
“It’s very obvious that we’re the police,” he said.
Well, sure. “Very obvious.” Clearly this dead, 69-year-old-man-with-cataracts, William Cooper, was just an idiot, then. Carry on.
It’s only been a few days since the shooting, but Hampton Police Chief Charles Jordan can already say he “feels confident” that his officers’ actions “were justified.” But not to worry. Just because Chief Jordan is already confident he knows the outcome of his department’s investigation doesn’t mean the investigation itself won’t be impartial.
So I guess it’s settled, then. Clearly this 69-year-old man who at worst was selling prescription painkillers (and again, we don’t yet have any evidence of that, other than an alleged tip from an informant, who will likely never be identified) knowingly, intentionally took on a team of raiding cops while armed only with a handgun. No need to question the tactics, here. No need to ask if it was really the smartest idea for armed cops to force their way into the home of a sick elderly man with poor vision to serve a search warrant for evidence of nonviolent crimes. No need to ask any further questions at all, really. Just put your faith in Chief Jordan and the integrity of his department’s not-at-all-predetermined investigation.
No, the only lesson we ought to draw from this police killing of a 69-year-old man in his own home . . . is that police work is dangerous.
MORE: From the comments:
A friend of mine was there. More specifically he was at his daughter’s softball game, 200ft away from the shooting. There were reports of stray rounds buzzing around. The game was call off due to everyone hitting the deck and generally freaking out. Haven’t seen anything in the articles about the fact that there were a couple dozen 10 year old kids playing just a stone’s throw away from the raid.
http://www.theagitator.com/2011/06/21/police-man-killed-by-police-during-paramilitary-drug-raid-shows-dangers-of-paramilitary-drug-raids-dangers-police-must-face-every-day/

Hardcore News Is Brought To You By...

Facebook Social & Comments

Hardcore Links